Leakage

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Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #6635
    Melodica-Me
    Participant

    Bruce, what you need to do first is now take the back off completely. Then check for any tears in the gasket. If none are found, place the back on a flat surface to check if flat and even. If the back is flat and even, test the back on the Melodica and see if it sits flat. If it does not check for abnormalities. If it fits flat. Place the back on the Melodica and put all the screws in 1/2 way in so the back is still loose. Not turn each screw 1 full turn each before moving to the next. Repeat this until the back is on securely. Do not over tighten, but do not leave loose. If you install a screw crooked it will feel like it is tight but in fact it will be loose. If you feel you have done this remove only that screw and reseat that screw. Once you have all the screws in you can check for leaks. If you have a flex hose
    this will help. With the flex hose installed turn the Melodica on it side and pour a little soap and water mixtures along the joint to see if you can see the leak when blown into it. If you do tighten it up a little more at the nearest screw, once again do not over tightens. If you still have leaks, mark these areas with a white grease pencil or with some masking tape. If leaks persist, open the Melodica and check at the areas where you placed the marks and check gasket there. If you see a tear or crease in the areas marked you can melt a little bees wax and fill the crease or tear to a flat even surface and replace the back and start the closing process over. Sometimes it’s just easier to replace the gasket but in a pinch this is a easy way to fix it.
    I hope this helps you a little.
    Melodica-Me
    Monsters of Melodica

    #6636
    Lowboy
    Participant

    Hi Bruce,

    The Piano 36 is a bit trickier to work on than most melodicas. Yes, you are right. It would have been better to live with a bit of leakage than to take that particular instrument apart. A lesson for everyone. But I probably would have done the same thing. Some tips are provided below.

    Vintage Hohners leak. I readily accept 5+ percent leakage with moderate-to-high blowing pressure because when you are playing the melodica, the valves are open, the pressure is lower, and there are no leaks. (Obviously this is not true with significant leaks at low low-pressure.) Many of my vintage Hohners will leak water after playing a long time. Again, less than perfection, but nearly the norm for vintage Hohners.

    Now to the solution. I took the back cover off one of my Piano 36s that I personally bought new, and noticed that in addition to the gasket, a white caulk/sealer was used at the four corners and the ends of the peak of the “roof” of the back cover. You have probably disturbed those sealing points. You may have to completely remove the back cover, inspect all sealing surfaces, remove the old caulk/sealer, put down a bead of new caulk/sealer, and reassembly using the techniques described above.

    Regards,

    Lowboy

    #6637
    Lowboy
    Participant

    By the way, several models of vintage Hohners–when shaken–will product a rattling sound like there is something inside. However, if you hold the handle while shaking these models, you will not hear a noise. The noise comes from the handle, not a loose part.

    This is not the case with my Hohner Piano 36s. They do not make a noise even when shaken without holding the handle.

    Lowboy

    #6639
    Bruce Krieg
    Participant

    I want to thank all of you so much for your support! This is a fantastic community of people who care. I appreciate it so much. I was able to follow your advice, consolidate the advice that was the same or similar and re-attach the back plate. Currently the melodica is playing as it was except it seems like the seal is not as good as it was. There are no leaks, but I’ve only been playing for a few minutes. This melodica when I purchased it on Sunday should have stayed as I bought it. I shouldn’t have investigated. Based on what you have said, it must have been in impeccable shape. I can accept the loss of air I’ve experienced since I re-attached the back plate. I’ll post again after I play more. Again, I appreciate your advice and concern. Bruce I don’t know how to attach a picture of what I found bouncing around and rattling inside but they were small, white, plastic circles that look like tiny washers or spacers. One had a crack in it and the other three were split in half. After I moved them together I decided they were originally four pieces. If I figure out how to post a picture, I’ll do that. Thanks again!

    #9505
    Russell Lechleiter
    Participant

    Just used chap stick on the plastic where the gaskets sit. Solved the leaking problem just fine. My Hohner Piano 36 plays better than when I bought it last year now.

    #9507
    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    Thanks for the suggestion, Russell. I’ll try it.

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