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  • #13492
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    Yes, on a 25-key soprano, the D4-D6 range would work very well.

    #13317
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    My question really is: would you prefer a 25-key melodica with a range shifted a bit upwards? To me, A3-A5 would be ideal.

    Yamaha isn’t likely to change the P-25F, but they or someone else could introduce a new model.

    One issue is that the keyboard layout would look very odd regarding the black and white key pattern; their current P-25, P-32, P-37 keyboard layouts look like what you’d expect on a keyboard. A shifted keyboard, especially, A3-A5, would probably need the top cover painted to show nonfunctional “phantom keys” just to avoid having unexpected visual distraction.

    #11848
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    Are there any videos or sound samples which compare the 44 and 44HP side by side – that is, same player, same song?

    From what I’ve been able to discern, the 44HP seems brighter and louder; the 44 more mellow – but when listening to different players and songs, it’s difficult to really know.

    #11336
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    A few questions:

    – What is the cost?

    – Can there be a light/dark pattern made which is typical of Janko keyboards?

    – Will keyboards be available for other 37-key melodicas, such as Yamaha or Suzuki?

    #11278
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    Jon Batiste

    #11275
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    The Brazilian pianist Vinheteiro is astonishingly talented. He often does amusing videos as well. Here is one, featuring a melodica, which he has played before.

    #11257
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    That was very pleasant and clear – a nice sound.

    Interesting: I thought there would be less water going into the instrument when using the tube.

    #11229
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    What a beautiful instrument – both artistically and in its capabilities.

    If I were still working rather than being retired on a fixed-income, I would seriously consider buying it.

    Good luck with your sale; the eventual buyer will be fortunate.

    #11225
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    Hello Lionel and David,

    Lionel, your posts and videos on Sax on the Web are what interested me about the melodica. Your playing of the P37D is very good.

    David, I am encouraged that you are still working on the Jankó keyboard. When that keyboard arrangement was first conceived, the mechanical complexities made costs and manufacturing difficult. But now with electronics I’m surprised we don’t have a revival.

    Yet, I think a Jankó melodica, being mechanical and using air, is still very complex.

    #11184
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    (well, maybe there is a more recent article than 2014 regarding Vibrandoneon reeds and I haven’t found it yet – this site has a wealth of information to pore through)

    #11183
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    Thank you, Daren! This is excellent information; I’m glad Yamaha, Suzuki, Suzuki/Hammond sell reed plates. It makes me worry less about my P-32D and upcoming P-37D.

    The last thread regarding Vibrandoneon reeds was this one, about six years ago:

    Help with Finding Vibrandoneon Reeds

    At the time, it appeared that Binci was unresponsive but Martin Maurer was able to supply the reeds. So is Binci once again a source these days?

    #11177
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    It seems Melodica-Me has already designed an item very close to what I’m looking for! I saw this yesterday in an old thread on this very site:

    Sometimes you just have to make it your self

    My version would have longer tubing and would be at a 45-degree angle (adjustable), with a final short straight segment going into the melodica.

    #11174
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    (* reviving an old thread here *)

    I’m new to the Melodica, coming to it as a tenor sax player. However, I also have dabbled in recorders and harmonicas for years and have learned to appreciate their capabilities. My interest in the sound and flexibility of the Hammond B3 led me to study the accordion, which eventually led here.

    Thanks to reviews and videos on this site, the P-32D I bought a few weeks ago seems to be just what I need. The sound is pleasant and its F3-C6 range is perfect for playing around in.

    #11170
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    For those very experienced with a keyboard and improvisation, the two octave range might be limiting. Perhaps it depends on one’s personal style or style of music. Genres that fit within concert F3 to F5 would interest me.

    On the other instruments I play, sometimes notes from concert G5 to C6 are needed for my favorite songs. So the P32D is perfect for me, but the P25F would be slightly limiting.

    I’m relatively new to keyboards (my home keyboard has 61 keys), but even my P32D’s short range is sometimes visually intimidating even though I know where all the notes are by patterns. Somehow I just get lost. In contrast, I think the P25’s layout would be trivial for me to comprehend. Well, these are just my beginner’s thoughts. For beginners, I do think starting with a 25 key layout is best.

    The P25 is so compact, so inviting. I think that adds to encouraging someone to just pick it up and start playing.

    The P25 really tempts me. The “classic” P-37D tempts me as well, even though I’d rarely use those five higher notes (I’d prefer more bass instead).

    #11168
    Pál Krammer
    Participant

    (for some reason my reply to this topic disappeared after making a very minor edit – I’m attempting to re-post it; my apologies if this somehow results in multiple identical replies)

    David: a question for you below.

    Initially I became interested in harmonicas and bought a few different models in different keys. I became a little disappointed in harmonica forums, books, and YouTube videos, because 99% of harmonica discussion seems to involve bending notes (certainly for Blues); it seems few are interested in playing the harmonica straight in First Position.

    Then, on a sax forum, someone who was actually interested in accordions bought a melodica because it was far less expensive and then a discussion ensued about both accordions and melodicas. Initially I’d never considered the accordion seriously, but as I learned about it, the register switches, the reed banks, the bass buttons, I became fascinated. I also like the artistic work of the faceplate and register switches of accordions. My local music store had five last month; they’ve sold two. I’ve given myself a year to study them before I consider buying one.

    Anyway, that melodica discussion along with samples of play led me to investigate further – which led me to videos and reviews on this site. I bought my first melodica, a P-32D, just last week.

    So – the Jankó keyboard! Pál von Jankó was a Hungarian, a pianist, and an engineer; I am just a Hungarian and an engineer. However, I am familiar with the clever design of his keyboard, although I’ve never seen a real one. In his day, such a keyboard would be mechanically complex; today, with electronics, such a keyboard is very feasible! So, David, have you constructed one? If so, surely it isn’t for a melodica – but perhaps I’m wrong?

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