New Hammond SS Soprano Melodica

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #2129
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant

    Well here is a picture of the new Hammond SS or S-27 Soprano Melodica. Just like the other Hammond Melodion’s this one comes with a pick up as well. I have been in the market for a soprano melodica for a while and this one may just fit the bill . Also like the other Hammond Melodion, they are on the higher side of the price scale. I have not played this one but I would assume that the price tag would probably put this one in the professional category. I personally like and prefer the Hammond melodions over other melodicas, but this is a personal opinion based on my use only. Suzuki also make a Soprano Melodion that is about a 1/3 of the cost of this one so you do have some choices.

    Melodica-Me

    New Hammond SS“>

    #2130
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant
    #2141
    AvatarAlan Brinton
    Participant

    I see that there are actually two other Suzuki sopranos, the S-32C (or S-32, which I guess is an earlier model) and the MX-27S. The MX melodions are Suzuki’s middle line, while the S-32C appears to be a member of the higher line that includes the M-32C, M-37C, and A-34C, all of which sit in a metal tray. The S-32C (or S-32) appears to me to be what’s inside the soprano Mylodica. But I’ve just ordered an S-32C and will be able to verify that and to make comparisons with the M-32C, etc. Kevin has a review posted for the S-32C.

    http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/reckb/item/s20_mx27s/

    http://www.suzukimusic.co.uk/educational/melodion.htm

    #2142
    AvatarKevin
    Participant

    Can we confirm the range of the the new Hammond and the MX-27S?
    If I’m reading the specs right, they both have their highest notes pitched just one whole tone above the standard three octave alto model.
    I fail to see what makes them soprano, or what advantage they would be?

    As far as I know, the S-32C is the only melodica that goes up to the high C two octaves above middle C? (feel free to correct me on this)
    To re-iterate my review it does put you in a different place sonically closer to what the range of a C tuned harmonica would cover.
    I plan on getting another one at some point.(Alan keep us posted on those sales!)
    I like the usual alto range F-below middle C up to three octaves above for solo playing but I think the lower octave can quickly lose it’s identity or even get muddied with other instruments.

    #2144
    AvatarAlan Brinton
    Participant

    Good points, Kevin. I enjoy the Yamaha P-25F because of its compactness and because its limitations encourage improvisation. I often pick it up to play by ear or have it handy when I’m at the piano keyboard to see what a passage I’m working on sounds like on the melodica. The short sopranos would have a similar appeal, just in a higher range. But I’m guessing that they would also be convenient and cool playing in a group like Melodica Madness, where you’re assigned a soprano part. Even to the extent that their upper range is just barely higher than that of a 37 key alto, they’re appropriately identified as soprano because of the limitation at the lower end.

    #2148
    AvatarAlan Brinton
    Participant

    Monsters of Melodica, I meant to say.

    #2243
    AvatarKevin
    Participant

    I agree with you Alan. The shorter melodicas can lead to different avenues of creativity and expression. I’m not worried here with the amount of notes but what notes can and can’t be produced.
    I really enjoyed having an instrument that can hit that high C. If it extends two octaves or three below that isn’t as relevant as the notes it has that the others don’t. The same with the bass melodica instruments.

    My concern is with the manufacturers loosely throwing terms around that can confuse the consumers and potentially composers and arrangers who are willing to work the melodica into a piece but need to know where it’s tonal limit is.

    This is another instance of the melodica not being taken seriously and seen as more of a toy or rudimentary learning tool.

    If I go to buy a soprano saxophone I would expect it to be able to cover a certain range of notes whether it was made by Yamaha or Selmer or someone else. Likewise the recorder (which isn’t taken that seriously itself).

    If I write a piece of music and score it for a soprano instrument I expect it to be able to hit certain notes and have a certain color of tone. If a player shows up with an alto instrument something is going to be amiss. Even if he has a technique to hit the high notes the quality of sound will be different much like counter tenors don’t sound like female sopranos or fingering the cello at the end of it’s fingerboard doesn’t sound the same as a violin.

    It’s probably too much to hope or expect the manufactures to come to an industry standard at this time. We should call them to task for using the terms soprano and alto so indiscriminately.

    #5774
    AvatarKevin
    Participant

    Ena Yoshida appears to be performing on the Hammond SS in this video. Displaying it’s very keening tone.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHOA4keYsN0
    She has posted several videos from this same concert with a very nimble bassist and nearly hidden guitarist.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSHB8a0l53s

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Back to top button