Hohner history

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 46 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #4206
    AvatarAlan Brinton
    Participant

    That would be great. I’m sure you will proceed with care. It’s a sacred relic.

    #4208
    AvatarAlan Brinton
    Participant

    Early vertical Piano 27 was out by 1963, as both the 26 and 27 were featured in a Marvin Kahn School Repertoire Series book published in 1963.

    #4209
    Daren BanarsëDaren Banarsë
    Keymaster

    Yes, take special care MM!

    #4211
    AvatarLowboy
    Participant

    Alan,

    What do you mean by vertical Piano 27? Does vertical refer to the model with keys versus the model with buttons? Is vertical your terminology or official terminology? Inquiring minds want to know. Thanks. Lowboy

    #4212
    AvatarAlan Brinton
    Participant

    Manji Suzuki, the long time developer of Suzuki harmonicas, bought a Hohner button model, probably the soprano HM-900, in a department store in Osaka in 1959. He referred to this instrument as a “vertical harmonica,” and subsequently decided to develop a model with a piano style keyboard. His first model of that appeared in 1961. He called it a “keyboard harmonica” and gave it the brand name of the Suzuki “Melodion”.

    Various early descriptive labels were given to the Hohner button models, for example “keyboard flute” (though “flute doesn’t seem to make sense at all). The early Piano 26 and 27 had the same basic configuration as the button models, an instrument played into the mouthpiece, vertically or at a downward slant, like a clarinet or saxophone. When you settled on “keyboard harmonica” as your generic term for melodicas, I thought that was inspired in the light of the Suzuki developments and the fact that “keyboard harmonica” is the Japanese generic term for the melodion, pianica, etc. So I’m suggesting “vertical melodica” as a term for the Hohner button and first generation Piano 26 and 27. In contrast, the Japanese and later Hohner melodicas with a tube tend to be held in a horizontal position, though many play them as you do in a vertical position or like a horn. But I’m just trying out terminology and wanting to distinguish the earlu Piano models from the later. The Japanese piano style melodicas are typically shown in advertisements in a horizontal position, for example on a desk, being played with a tube by children. I guess we might refer to this as the “horizontal style” of playing, not your preferred method we know, as contrasted with your “vertical” style of playing. The vertical style is of course more conducive to thinking of the melodica as primarily a wind instrument rather than a keyboard. When I got my first melodica, I quickly came to the conclusion that this was the better way for me to think of it, and that I shouldn’t be trying to play it like a piano.

    #4213
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant

    So here you go, the mythical Hohner Solist. After taking my time to open up the Solist I did not find a date on the gasket as I did on the Professional 36. But quite different from the Professional 36. The Solist is a bit more refined than the Professional 36, the back panel is split in the center where as the Pro 36 is one piece. This allowing the air chamber to be opened without taking the entire Melodica apart. The end caps on the Professional 36 are wood where the Solist are hard plastic possibly ABS. The air the Handel is wider and softer on the Solist than on the Pro 36. Where all other Hohner Melodicas the logo and the model are painted on the body the Solist has more of a badge (acrylic) to be exact that is attached to the body. The reeds appeared to be the same as the professional 36 as is the rest of the mechanism. The mouth piece post is thicker and has a tappered base as the professional 36 has no post. Unlike the Piano 36 where the post is thin and weak, this is where they usually break. I do not have a decent scale to measure the weight of each but the Solist seams to be weigh a little more than the Professional 36. No logo of the Hohner man playing the accordion and only the words “Made in Germany”. In general they are not at all the same. I have attached a site where pictures have been posted. Enjoy
    Melodica-Me
    Monsters of Melodica.

    By the way, I have been tracking the arrival of the ultra rare Hohner Electra Melodica, and if all the planets align in the proper position it should hit my door step in the next day or so.
    http://monstersofmelodica.smugmug.com/Hohner-Solist

    #4217
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant

    So here you go, the mythical Hohner Solist. After taking my time to open up the Solist I did not find a date on the gasket as I did on the Professional 36. But quite different from the Professional 36. The Solist is a bit more refined than the Professional 36, the back panel is split in the center where as the Pro 36 is one piece. This allowing the air chamber to be opened without taking the entire Melodica apart. The end caps on the Professional 36 are wood where the Solist are hard plastic possibly ABS. The air the Handel is wider and softer on the Solist than on the Pro 36. Where all other Hohner Melodicas the logo and the model are painted on the body the Solist has more of a badge (acrylic) to be exact that is attached to the body. The reeds appeared to be the same as the professional 36 as is the rest of the mechanism. The mouth piece post is thicker and has a tappered base as the professional 36 has no post. Unlike the Piano 36 where the post is thin and weak, this is where they usually break. I do not have a decent scale to measure the weight of each but the Solist seams to be weigh a little more than the Professional 36. No logo of the Hohner man playing the accordion and only the words “Made in Germany”. In general they are not at all the same. I have attached a site where pictures have been posted. Enjoy
    Melodica-Me
    Monsters of Melodica.

    By the way, I have been tracking the arrival of the ultra rare Hohner Electra Melodica, and if all the planets align in the proper position it should hit my door step in the next day or so.

    #4219
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant
    #4220
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant

    Having issues trying to load the link to the Solist pictures may need some help from Alan here.
    http://monstersofmelodica.smugmug.com/Hohner-Solist

    #4221
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant


    Having issues trying to up load link to Solist pictures.

    #4222
    AvatarAlan Brinton
    Participant

    Terrific photos. I’m thinking it takes time to access the slideshow at Smugmug, and you need to wait longer for the process to be completed before trying again.

    You may have covered this before, but what kind of spit valve/release does the Professional have? The one on the Solist is old style. Maybe this is influenced by the construction and material of the endpieces or two-piece bottom construction of the Solist.

    I’m guessing that the tendency of the mouthpiece receptacle to break on some 36 key Hohners is at least partly due to the length of the usual two mouthpieces, as a result of which more leverage is applied.

    #4223
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant

    Thanks Alan, I will have to ask Daren, to clean up my mess here LOL. I have (3) Professional 36 (2) are Identical that require that you unscrew a white cap and blow the moisture out. The last one I purchased, pictured with the date of 1962 on the gasket has a button you push to release the moisture. The ones with the cap are better than the ones with the button, I feel you can get more moisture out. I would think you are correct especially if the use of the long thin mouth piece is used. From talking to friends that have broken theirs, it seams it is always human error (dropping) hitting the mouth piece. forgetting to take out the mouth piece before putting it in the case. The thin wall is prone to cracks by simply inserting the mouth piece in and out.
    Melodica-Me

    #4227
    AvatarLowboy
    Participant

    The Holy Grail of melodicas.

    Lowboy

    #4228
    AvatarMelodica-Me
    Participant

    I would like to report that the Hohner Electra arrived today and with heavy heart I have to Announce that the “perfect” yes perfect Hohner electra was damaged during shipping. Fortunately it was just an end cap that cracked but did not completely break and once repaired should not be noticeable to the human eye. One control pot got bent but still completely functional, the moisture tube (interior) was loose but not broken (already repaird that) the instrument in general is now with consideration for the end cap that I will repair is a 98 out of 100 condition. I do not think there is another example in better condition. Completely excited about the purchase. Now for the sound, I will only say that it definately sounds like something out of the sixties. The Electra unlike our normal Melodicas is a monophonic instrument so only one note can be played at a time “lead or solos” very close to the sound of a Farfisa Organ on oboe setting, I am sure I will catch the ear of a hippie or love child with this One. The case, cords along with the power supply and manual, all look new and no signs of use, if so it was used very very little. There is no Physicsl wear that I can see even on the white trumpet mouth pieces. I will take picture hopefully in the next few days and post.
    Melodica-Me

    #4229
    Daren BanarsëDaren Banarsë
    Keymaster

    Sorry to hear about the damage MM. Looks like you’ve still got yourself a fine new toy!

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 46 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Warning: call_user_func_array() expects parameter 1 to be a valid callback, class 'TIELABS_BBPRESS' does not have a method 'share_buttons' in /home/customer/www/melodicaworld.com/public_html/wp-includes/class-wp-hook.php on line 287
Back to top button